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Don’t Should On Yourself or Others

One of the most, overused, overrated words in our English vocabulary is should.  “Shoulds” are freely given out in many scenarios: choices around diet, food, family, and other personal situations.  How many times have we heard the phrases: “You should, they should, he should, she should..” or worst of all “I should”  Why is this word so powerful and why should we take the power out of it, either by not using it or substituting for a different word such as “could”? Let’s start with a simple example around food: “I should eat a spinach salad” Sets us up for expectations You are committing yourself to a meal that you may not be fond of. Maybe you do like spinach, but maybe you would prefer to get your veggies in another way – such as sautéed with eggs, mixed in with lentil pasta, or blended in a smoothie. Implies judgment Don’t be so hard yourself. And on others. Adding this person “should” or I “should” to your vocabulary assigns a task that may or may not be appropriate for someone, but ultimately it’s their (or your) decision. Takes the joy out of an activity When has it ever been ‘fun’ to receive a should? When we have a benchmark for something that hasn’t happened yet, it can feel discouraging when we miss certain steps along the way. If you instead say: “I could eat a spinach salad”, suddenly your food choices become an option, a choice, an invitation to better health. It’s aspiring without expecting. By exchanging the simple word “should” with “could” in our vocabulary, opportunities will open...

Holiday Eating Strategies!

Get our free handout. This educational handout is filled with tips for eating healthy during the holidays! Print this handout for your fridge! Don’t forget – eating a few homemade treats during the holidays is absolutely fine – just make sure you also eat a healthy diet filled with rainbow fruits & veggies, lean protein, healthy fats and lots of leafy greens! In good health –...

Five-Day Meal Plan – Cancer Recovery

Download our Free Meal Plan here. This meal plan, which is focuses on a woman – 150 pounds (calories can be adjusted to individual needs). To support this building diet direction (for a cancer recovery patient), the following macronutrient ratios are recommended: Proteins (20-30%), Fats (25-45%), and Carbohydrates (30-50%). Three key nutrients to increase are: protein, folate, and Vitamin B12. Other synergistic foods and nutrients to support this building diet are: essential fatty acids (salmon, flaxseed), high flavonoid foods (EVOO, berries), L-glutamine and zinc (walnuts, turkey, chicken). Check back this month for recipes included in the meal plan. Read the full condition & nutrient report here....

Take the “Work” out of your Workout

There is no doubt that physical exercise is a buffer against chronic pain, disease, depression and many other uncomfortable and debilitating conditions. But why do so many of us find it so difficult? Is it the time? One hour of exercise is equal to 4% of our day. Considering the average American watches 5 hours of television per day (20% of the day), time can’t be the issue. Is it diet-related? Could be. If you’re eating the Standard American Diet, filled with processed foods (including breads, cereals, boxed meals, and frozen dinners), you will most likely have a lot less energy than someone that consumes a plant-based diet (whether eating meat or not). I’d like to take this subject one step further. Boils down to one word: enjoyment. If you enjoy your workout, you are much more apt to stick with your routine.  Over the years, I have noticed that when my family and friends find an activity they truly enjoy, feel connected to, and/or includes group involvement, they perform this health-boosting activity on a consistent basis. How do you find an activity that you enjoy? Ask around. You may not know where to start. Ask a friend or coworker who is always glowing when they get into work in the morning. There is a reason people are more productive after a solid workout– they are actually generating more energy. Join a club. Whether it be running, cycling, triathlon, tennis, or volleyball, finding a community adds to the enjoyment factor of any workout. Try everything. Here is a partial list of the activities I have explored over the years:  martial...

Five-Day Meal Plan – Autism

Get our free meal plan. Download this meal plan, which is focuses on a child – 45 pounds. Total calorie requirements are ~1,400 with the following caloric ranges: 420-630 carbs, 350-420 protein and 420-560 fat. Day One of our meal plan includes a macronutrient ratio of 41% carb, 25% protein, and 34% fat. Foods were chosen to be budget-friendly and provide plenty of leftovers so the family can enjoy during the week, without too much extra time prep. Check back this week for recipes included in the meal plan. Read the full condition & nutrient report here....

Condition and Nutrient Report: Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

Download the report here. Get my free handout. Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis is an autoimmune condition in which the thyroid antibodies attack the thyroid gland, limiting the production of the important thyroid hormones. The production of these hormones is incredibly important to the body because the thyroid is responsible for energy production for nearly every cell, tissue, and organ in the body. It is the “Metabolic Powerhouse” for the body. When the damage to the thyroid starts to take place, hormones are released into the bloodstream to compensate, which may show normal range levels. However, as time goes on, the person affected may start to show signs of hypothyroidism, an underactive thyroid (Wentz, 2013). Signs of hypothyroidism include: • Very slow pulse rate (40-60 beats/minute) • High blood pressure • Sensitivity to cold • Mild-severe depression • Constipation • Hardening of stools • Bloating • Poor appetite • Weight gain • Enlarged thyroid gland • Sluggishness • Brittle fingernails • Thin, dry hair (Rosenthal, 2009) As more thyroid tissue is destroyed, the body is unable to compensate and the person becomes deficient in thyroid hormone. Ultimately, the thyroid completing stops releasing hormones and medical, lifestyle, and/or nutrition intervention must take place. This is referred to as the end stage of Hashimoto’s (Wentz, 2013). Up to 10% of the population is affected by Hashimoto’s, affecting more women than men. For every seven women, there is usually one man diagnosed. There is a strong genetic component and HT usually runs in families. Hormonal fluctuations and increasing age may contribute to the development of Hashimoto’s. There is a higher incidence of HT in Caucasians...
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